Posts Tagged The RE Store

Community Co-op Connection building – materials to live on

coop connections bldg salvage collage

On Feb. 16th The RE Store salvage crew pulled materials from the former Community Food Co-op Connections building at the south end of the Forest Street Co-op’s parking lot. The whole building is currently being deconstructed by Bellingham-based Reuse Consulting – all to make way for more parking and a bike structure for the Co-op. There was some strong interest in moving the beloved mid-century building as a whole, but some aspect of that plan did not work out with the City of Bellingham planning department, and thus the Co-op set out with the goal to have 95% of the materials be reused. Some materials will stay on site to create the new bike structure, while others will be used to create an event center off-site.

The building was designed by Bellingham architect Jim Zervas, who studied under Frank Lloyd Wright and was a distinguished NW architect and planner for more than 50 years in the Bellingham and Whatcom County community.

In the words of our out-going Communications Director, Peter Frazier:

One of the finest examples of PNW mid-century architecture is being deconstructed to make way for the Food Co-op’s enlarged parking lot. James Zervas’ early ’60s Western Optical Building looked gorgeous from every angle, featured impeccable lines, and divine proportions. It was a lovely human-scale building that, like the best PNW architecture, brings the outside in, establishing a two-way relationship with the environment.

It’s been in my life for a half century. I first noticed it when I was about four years old because it looked remarkably like my house on Chuckanut (the house I still live in) but was improbably placed in the middle of the city. I’ve had the pleasure of shopping for glasses there as a boy, leading a strategic planning session there for KCLT about ten years ago, and most recently, inspecting the original hand drawn plans at Dominique Zervas’ Bellingham law office.

It was one of those classic PNW things, like a Salish Sea cobble beach, a Skagit Valley landscape painting, a crab feed with garlic butter, a Boundary Bay IPA, a live edge table by Smith + Vallee, a kayak in the rain, or a smoke-filled Waterfront Tavern.

It will be missed.

The RE Store salvage crew removed fir trim, windows, doors and stainless counters – all of which are in the store now. Come get a piece of this unique landmark for yourself!

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Thank YOU volunteers of 2015!

volunteers 2015 collage

We couldn’t do what we do without the help of volunteers, and 2015 was no exception. In fact, we had more volunteer hours this year than ever before:

Total combined volunteer hours for The RE Store:  203 participants with a total of 4833.87 hours
Breakdown: 78 volunteer participants with 1304.23 hours
113 community service participants with 2121.83 hours
12 trainees with 1407.81 hours

And 89 volunteers for RE Sources events totally 445 hours bringing the grand total to 292 people and 5278.87 hours of people helping us with everything from store displays and salvage services to outreach and events. Thank YOU volunteers!! And a very special shout out to the man with a special gift and commitment to this program, our Volunteer Manager, Ben Lewis.

Considering volunteering with us in 2016? More information can be found on our website here.

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Many salvage details make a home

An office building originally built in 1912 for the Gooding Shingle and Saw Mill has slowly been made into a home since 2006 by its current owners — with a lot of patience and many trips over the years for parts and materials at The RE Store. Salvage items from The RE Store listed below:

 

A) Storm sash in place for old double hung window—enough for all the windows collected from the store over the years.
B) Computer work station. 1″ CVG fir top, solid oak cabinet, refinished.
C) Workshop storage cabinet, from WWU chemistry labs. 1 3/4″ maple bench top rescued from dumpster at Whatcom Middle School when they converted the wood shop to a computer room.
D) Double swinging doors.
E) Claw foot tub, refinished along with beveled tongue & groove red cedar paneling.
F) Light duty Dayton table saw.
G) Hemlock ceiling—beveled and tongue & groove milled on table saw.
H) Slate blackboard and CVG fir frame and chalk rail.
I) Stairway with 1″ CVG fir treads came in two pieces from a South Hill home. Oak hand rail also salvaged. Balustrade from re-used straight grained old growth fir. Cedar stanchion, 45 rings per inch, beach-combed from Cherry Point.

Do you have similar projects that use salvage materials?  From the big gestures to the small details – we love to see them all and see the new chapters of our materials’ lives. Send us your pics — and inspire others!  bray [at] re-store.org

 

 

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Celebrate community, country and delicious craft beer – all for a great cause!

Coaster for DaleThis Fourth of July, from 6 to 10 p.m., join in the fun at the Yes We, CAN! Canned Craft Beer Festival to celebrate community, country and delicious craft beer – all for a great cause. Held on the 1400 block of W Holly St in Bellingham (outside of Elizabeth Station, beer retailer and taproom), this event will feature more than 40 breweries, cideries, and meaderies. There will be music from Bluegrass and Americana-stomp bands Polecat and Wild Rabbit, live performances from the Bellingham Circus Guild, RE Store games for the kids, street food, and one of the best views of the fireworks show in town. Tickets are only $20 in advance ($25 at the door), and admission includes 3 drink tickets. Kids 14 and under get in free.

The RE Store is hosting this family-friendly 4th of July festival because we care about waste and recycling. This event is about changing consumer perception of canned beer, and raising awareness around packaging choices. Aluminum cans, when recycled, are a superior packaging option for beer – one of the most largely consumed products in America. Aluminum cans contain a higher percentage of recycled materials, require fewer fossil fuels in the recycling process and transportation, and are infinitely recyclable. We want shoppers to think more carefully about the source and destination of the packaging their goods come in. And we want to have fun while doing it.

RE Sources & The RE Store are responsible for the adoption of curbside recycling in the state of Washington thirty years ago. The RE Store was founded ten years later to divert the #1 source of landfill waste into a usable or recyclable commodity. It’s part of who we are to constantly think of new ways to conserve more, reuse more, and recycle more. This festival is about getting people to stop and think – the container around that beer you’re drinking? – it matters.

Buy tickets online at universe.com/yeswecanbeerfest or around Bellingham at the Community Food Co-ops, Kulshan Brewery, Elizabeth Station or The RE Store. For more information, visit re-sources.org/yeswecan.

Or, volunteer for free admission! We need over 150 fun-loving helpers to make this event a success. Volunteers receive free admission (which includes three tickets for 5.5 oz beer tastings, root beer floats, or food and entrance to a great concert), a RE Store t shirt, and a perk packet of discounts and gift certificates to businesses around town (Backcountry Essentials, Aslan, Kulshan, Nuu-muu, The RE Store and more!). Get in free, have a ball, and help RE Sources continue to protect and empower our community. Register now! If you have questions, contact Jen Castaldo, jencastal[at]gmail.com, or call (360) 961.1957.

All proceeds benefit RE Sources for Sustainable Communities. Thanks so much to our sponsors: Alcoa, RDS, Bellingham Tap Trail, Puget Sound Benefits, KISM, The Adam Vwich Agency, Nuu-muu, Community Food Co-op, Ball Corp, Kulshan Brewery, Aslan Brewery, Muds to Suds, NW Recycling, Rice Insurance, Johnson Team Real Estate, Backcountry Essentials, Boundary Bay Brewery, Mt Baker Experience, Bellingham Herald, Village Books and Elizabeth Station.

BENEFITS OF CANS:

  • Cans are impervious to the damaging effects of light and they are hermetically sealed leaving little air space inside, preventing oxygen from damaging the beer. Cans have an aqueous polymer liner that locks in flavor and keeps the beer from coming in contact with aluminum.
  • Cans are 100-percent recyclable and made up of more recycled content than glass or plastic. They do not break, and crush easily making them easier to recycle — and can be recycled indefinitely. They are lighter and use less packaging material, requiring less fuel to ship.
  • Cans do not break, so they’re safer than glass, and they are lighter and more compact for packing in coolers, and in-and-out of outdoors. They chill quicker too.

 

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Volunteers of 2014 – We Couldn’t Have Done it Without You!

“When I started in this position a little over a year ago, I just hoped that we could help people in our community in some way. I was confident that we would be able to educate our trainees with skill-building, but realized over time we’d also be helping them become advocates for our environment, too. What I also recognized along the way is that our environment is not just the rivers, lakes, and oceans – it is the people as well.”
– Ben Lewis – Volunteer & Jobs Training Manager, The RE Store

Our Volunteer & Jobs Training Manager, Ben Lewis, with two of our valuable 2014 trainees – Frank (left) and Carlos (right)

One of the things we’re most proud of here at The RE Store from 2014 is our growing Jobs Training program, providing skills, confidence, and a future for so many individuals.

In 2014 we had:

 10 Trainees who worked a total of 1210 hours.

 91 Volunteers who worked a total of 1512 hours.

 and 123 Community Service Volunteers who worked a total of 2409 hours!

As they’ve gained a broad range of skills – everything from general store organizational tasks and proper use of tools, to building repurposed items for our RE Vision Division – they’ve also enjoyed the bonus of giving back to our broader community. Thank you to each and every one of those trainees and volunteers we’ve had in the store this past year!  We couldn’t have done it without you.

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The Booths of Many Lives

All the materials at The RE Store have former lives and stories, but some have even more layers of history than usual. Our field crew picked up ten of these double-sided turquoise blue and burgundy booths from Pepper Sisters Restaurant as they were undergoing a recent renovation. Pepper Sisters got the booths from the venerable Bunk’s Drive-In in the early 90’s as they were closing.

booths of many lives

Once we had these unique pieces, we listed them on Craigslist (always a good place to see the latest and greatest in the store!) where the film crew for the Vancouver-based show, “Supernatural” found them a few days later. They quickly snatched up seven of them for use in the upcoming season as part of a hotel and restaurant setting. The set designer was excited to find out about The RE Store – and is committed to the booths being salvaged once again after they conclude their use on the set. Stay tuned for where they may turn up next… and come find the remaining booths (and others like them) at the our store.

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Volunteers Re-purpose in the RE Patch

Beth Linkinholder is our volunteer RE Patch Coordinator this year, (for those not in the know, the RE Patch is our working garden out behind the warehouse of our Bellingham store). Beth has been a wonderful addition to our RE-team – at first glance of our RE Patch  she noticed that our two monstrous compost piles needed to be processed and rebuilt. She took it on herself to recruit Five Whatcom Community College environmental science students that needed community service for their class requirements and two of her personal friends to come and take on this project.  They re-purposed wooden pallets to create the new-to-us compost bin (in photos below).  We wish we had some ‘before’ photos to show just how much this was needed – but suffice it to say, we are excited for the new order in the RE Patch. Beth will be planning other RE Patch gardening work parties throughout the summer – contact our volunteer coordinator, Ben Lewis, if you are interested in joining in on the FUN!

RE Patch compost bin RE Do

Thanks so much to the compost bin volunteer team: Jeff Hill, Jewell Hamilton, Rosa Posas, Sarah Bock, Micah Evangelista, and John & Stacy Crampton

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With Endings, Come New Beginnings

As many of you know, we’ve been going through some transitions at The RE Store. For those of you that may have missed the news, after much deliberation the Board of RE Sources for Sustainable Communities (our parent nonprofit) decided to close the Seattle store as of June 13th to focus our efforts on serving NW
Washington at our Bellingham location.

We are incredibly appreciative of the support that Seattle (and the Ballardcommunity in particular) has shown us over the past 15 years by way of shopping at the store, bringing us your donations, taking part in our workshops, attending our Recycled Arts Shows – and generally helping us spread the culture of reuse.

However – with all endings, there are new beginnings, and we are incredibly excited to pass on the news that the managers of The RE Store in Seattle have pulled together to open up a new reuse center – Ballard Reuse.  The store will ensure that the North Seattle community retains a used building materials store and will give the community the same service and commitment to keeping materials out of the landfill that they’ve come to expect. It officially opened June 16th – same location, same phone numbers and same friendly faces you’ve seen at The RE Store in Seattle over the last 10+ years.  We are happy to support this new reuse store and we wish them all the best.

10379531_1421967964751175_7137920475298043546_oFind out more about Ballard Reuse on their webpage:  www.ballardreuse.com
And check out their Grand Opening on June 28th!  

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Many Thanks to the Volunteers of Fall 2013!

The RE Store couldn’t do as much as it does without the help of volunteers and students.  We’ve had an especially good crop this fall at our Bellingham store and wanted to take a moment during this holiday season to highlight a few we are thankful for:

sally and susan

Sally Hileman and Susan Marshall (above) are regulars at the Fountain (restaurant across the street) and after sitting and sharing some coffee looking out towards our building they decided that our landscaping could use a face lift, which they swiftly volunteered to do.  These ladies were a ton of fun to have around, and plan on coming back this spring to continue to maintain and add to the flower beds.

professional communications students

The students of Professor Diane Blietz-Hertberg’s Professional Communications 318 class were tasked with studying our communications within the workplace.  This project included a report about our internal communications, a Safe Lifting Techniques report, and creating a bathroom vignette window display for us.  Students involved in the project: Ali El-husseini, Samantha Stahle, Jennifer Conn, and Chad Spady.

 Jenrri and Greg

Jenrri Hough (above left) is a long-term volunteer that has been awesome helping with many things around the store, and Greg George (above, right) has been our much appreciated paint guru of late.

Thank you so much to these volunteers and students, as well as the countless others not named here but just as important, that have helped us in 2013 in both Bellingham and Seattle!  For volunteer opportunities, contact our stores here.

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World’s Market Waste IS a “Local” Resource

by Eberhard Eichner,  REvision Division Lead Designer/Builder at The RE Store in Bellingham

This is the season where even the best of us can get bit by the shop-and-buy bug. It is also the season for reflection. These two, seemingly contradictory endeavors can go together, when our thinking/shopping habits include the notion of “repurpose”.

When our trees are cut, and ships are loaded with them for far away countries whose economies with cheap labor manufacture ready to assemble furniture components and other items to send back to us – we have also shipped off the pride in our own ability to craft and build. That can suck us down into depression. Not only for the loss of our jobs and skills and the undervaluing of theirs; or for the exploitation of human and environmentally resources globally; but also for the ultimate waste that happens when we consume to excess. What a burden we have taken on in believing we have a duty to consume new goods in order to spike the graph of limitless growth! Even when we shop sincerely for the things that make us functional, cozy and secure (a basic human need!) – what is happening to all the stuff that doesn’t make quality control anyway, that isn’t of consistent stain color, hole pattern and size, or just ‘outdated?

You may be boarding my thought train now, headed for the landfills in those same denuded hills or, more cynically, another way of “outsourcing”- sending the now jettisoned flotsam by barge to more “disposable” locations. But wait! There is a station called “Repurpose”, where we can stop this train wreck in the making and divert it’s direction to a more viable goal.

Repurpose is the grown-up sibling of Recycling. Though recycling is a respectable way of saving our planet and resources by properly disposing and regurgitating our wastes into “new-and-raw-again” materials for production, it is still quite energy and resource intensive.  Repurposing is the way of direct conversion that increasingly can be seen in our communities. It’s the growing trend of artisans, craftspeople, manufacturers and do-it-yourselfers to turn the waste of our market economy, including the “global”, directly into imaginative re-uses by simply converting the components with no or little alterations into new items of stunning beauty. We honor the efforts, resources and energies spent. We continue the story of making, rather then trash it. We have fun!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And it is done here, locally – yes, jobs and the “stuff” –  case in point is a load of imported, yet orphaned parts from an Asian furniture manufacturer once designed to be bed headboards, rails and drawer fronts. Now they are REvisioned by virtually no cutting or refinishing into bookcases (photo above), stand-up desks, storage shelves and for “new” components to hall benches and more at The RE Store.  These and more can be viewed on The RE Store’s website galleries.

‘Tis the season, alright, to reflect on what we consider waste, how we can use it as local resource and turn it into good, for good.

Get inspired to do your own re-creations.  Shop local, shop repurposed.

 

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