Posts Tagged home decor

Many salvage details make a home

An office building originally built in 1912 for the Gooding Shingle and Saw Mill has slowly been made into a home since 2006 by its current owners — with a lot of patience and many trips over the years for parts and materials at The RE Store. Salvage items from The RE Store listed below:

 

A) Storm sash in place for old double hung window—enough for all the windows collected from the store over the years.
B) Computer work station. 1″ CVG fir top, solid oak cabinet, refinished.
C) Workshop storage cabinet, from WWU chemistry labs. 1 3/4″ maple bench top rescued from dumpster at Whatcom Middle School when they converted the wood shop to a computer room.
D) Double swinging doors.
E) Claw foot tub, refinished along with beveled tongue & groove red cedar paneling.
F) Light duty Dayton table saw.
G) Hemlock ceiling—beveled and tongue & groove milled on table saw.
H) Slate blackboard and CVG fir frame and chalk rail.
I) Stairway with 1″ CVG fir treads came in two pieces from a South Hill home. Oak hand rail also salvaged. Balustrade from re-used straight grained old growth fir. Cedar stanchion, 45 rings per inch, beach-combed from Cherry Point.

Do you have similar projects that use salvage materials?  From the big gestures to the small details – we love to see them all and see the new chapters of our materials’ lives. Send us your pics — and inspire others!  bray [at] re-store.org

 

 

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“I like to make things from old stuff, the crustier the better.”

Regular shopping at The RE Store, Laurel Hair’s life-long love of salvage began with her dad taking her and her sister to garage sales when she was a kid. She loves to browse salvage stores for treasures and making new things out of old things – a few of which she is sharing with us below (in Laurel’s words): 

Laurel Hair projects

1) Fireplace gate hanging — the gate with original hinges is from my fiancés’ parents’ old house. He grew up in the house in Kirkland, and I took some items before it was sold and torn down, not knowing what I was going to do with them. Once we moved into our new house, I saw on a TV show the idea of using a piece of gate as a wall hanging, and spiffed it up, mainly wire brushed it. My son had given me the rusty sign as a gift a while ago, which I thought was a good compliment.

2) Wall hangings for the bedroom (one shown here) — I had found the turquoise old gate pieces at a garage sale a couple of years earlier. I decided to hang them on our wall, cut one down to size so they matched, and left the old hinges on them. I found some old farm pictures that I framed with old looking frames at Michaels that happened to have a great turquoise rim, and attached those to the gate.

3) Map wall hanging – my fiancé likes maps. We had one of the San Juans, so I stained it to make it look old, pieced together some old cedar fence pieces, and then added some old hinges and a few other rusty items. The ring was a piece from my fiancé’s cabin in Cle Elum off an old post. The metal piece I bought at a salvage store, and the other pieces were found at a junk fair in Ellensburg. I then cut the map into pieces and decoupaged to the wood.

4)  Christmas trees – again, I saw a different version of this idea somewhere as a wall hanging, and for Christmas gifts I decided to make smaller ones on stands out of old molding we had, old wooden rulers I found at garage sales, and pieces of driftwood. I cut the stars out of a piece of galvanized metal HVAC piping that I had lying around.

5) Christmas balls – I saw this idea at an antique store, and made my own frame out of old cedar I had collected, then added some old screen, and the balls. I can put other things on it for other holidays.

Thanks to Laurel for sharing her projects! Have your own before & after projects you’d like to show off?  Send us your pics!  bray [at] re-store.org

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I’m Dreaming of a Green Christmas…

Tips for a more sustainable holiday season from our  intern extraordinaire, Diane Lawrence

The holidays are a wonderful time centered around family, cheer, and the idea of giving. Moving away from our consumerist mentality and focusing on these key values, we can also be more conscious of the holidays’ effect on the environment. Did you know that Americans throw away 25% more trash between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Eve? That’s a lot of excess waste! To help eliminate this waste and to conserve our natural resources, we’ve compiled a list of helpful tips to keep in mind during all the festivities this holiday season:

snow_trees_and_barn

DECORATING

  • Decorate with LED string lights – they save 90% more energy than incandescent lights and will last up to 100,000 hours
  • Set your lights on a timer – turning on the lights only once it’s dark will avoid unnecessary energy use
  • Use bows and garlands instead – replacing lights with this energy-free option will cut back on your electricity bill and the planet will thank you


CHRISTMAS TREES

  • Use a real tree – artificial trees consume energy and petroleum based materials during production, plus real trees have that authentic pine smell!
  • Compost your tree – they are a great source as mulch after the holidays


ENTERTAINING

  • Donate excess food to the food bank (if possible) – the holidays tend to mean lots of leftovers, help someone in need instead of throwing that extra food away
  • Send invitations and holiday letters via email  – save a tree by sending your holiday mail digitally this year
  • Use your finest tableware – instead of disposable plates and utensils, which will reduce waste and make your table look festive
  • Lower the thermostat during a party – the body heat should be enough to keep you warm!


GIFT GIVING

  • Do a Secret Santa exchange – reducing your gift giving to one person saves you money and allows you to focus more on one special gift while also reducing the total consumption of your family
  • Give battery free gifts – the EPA estimates that 40% of all battery sales occur during the holidays, keep these hazardous materials out of the landfill by giving a gift that doesn’t require batteries
  • (and our favorite) Give a gift made from reused or recycled materials – or make one yourself! Look for materials down at The RE Store to create a thoughtful homemade gift – or give a gift certificate to The RE Store for that person on your list in need of home project materials.  

Thanks to Diane for all her work with us this semester!

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Serendipity at The RE Store

IMG_2212We love a little serendipity here at The RE Store – and we recently had one of those moments at the Seattle store where just the right item was no longer needed in its home at the exact moment that it was needed in a new place.  Our crew backed up the truck to the store from a day in the field, and unloaded a set of French doors from a 1909 West Seattle house.  The door set was still leaning on the back edge of the truck as Bruce, the owner of Comstock Apartments – a 1909 building on Queen Anne – walked into the bay of the store in need of some doors, with the exact dimensions of this set that just came in. He wanted to keep with the original look of the apartment and building – and found it here, just off the truck! As many of you know, and our door sections can attest, most anything built in the Northwest before the mid-last-century was not of a standard size.  So to find the exact size, from the same year/era building at that moment must have been fate.

You never know what might be waiting for you – come to either store to see if that hard-to-find item is here!  

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4 Easy DIY projects for Anyone to Try!

Are you interested in creating a project made from recycled materials but don’t know where to start? Do you feel you lack the “handyman” skills necessary to revamp salvaged items? Some larger projects can definitely feel a bit daunting, but there are plenty of small scale DIY items that do not require any construction experience.   Here at The RE Store, we know it can be intimidating to scour our store searching for inspiration and it can be difficult to visualize a finished product from the vast selection of materials, so here is a list of simple projects to get your creativity bubbling.

collage of easy DIY projects

1. Ceramic Tile Coaster

The RE Store’s tile section is overflowing with various sizes and colors of tile. Pick some up to turn into coasters or hot plates. Use your imagination to decorate the tiles to spice up your decor; I like the idea of mod-podging a map onto the tile, as seen above. Purchase some felt adhesives at your nearest craft shop, and you’ve got some unique coasters to show off on your coffee table. (PS-tiles similar to the ones shown above are on sale at Etsy for $18 dollars. You can make the exact same thing at the RE Store for under $5!)

2.  Repurposed Picture Frame

Use a cabinet door or window trim to create your own custom picture frame. All you need is a saw to cut the frame pieces and some wood glue to put the frame together. Use all the same materials like the one pictured above, or mix and match different trims for a funky, vintage vibe.

3. Cabinet Door Turned Chalkboard

The RE Store has a number of cabinet doors waiting to be recycled into a new product. One of the easiest re-vamping projects is to select a cabinet door you find appealing and simply paint it’s face with chalkboard paint. Tape off the outer border of the cabinet door before painting to maintain a frame for the chalkboard. You can purchase chalkboard paint at most hardware or craft stores, and keep an eye out for chalkboard paint offered in colors other than black as well!

4. Salvaged Window Coffee Table

For a more involved idea, you can tackle this project to build your own piece of furniture. It might be easier to modify the picture shown above and create a box as the base of the table, as seen here on the Oh! Glory Vintage blog. The RE Store has tons of awesome salvaged windows that have an antique feel to them. Find one you like and purchase some wood and a few hinges to complete the project.  Build a box to fit the dimensions of the window and search for some furniture legs in our cabinet hardware department.  Attach the legs to the bottom of the box and attach the window with the hinges, place a few of your favorite books and knick knacks on display and voila! You have created a custom coffee table that fits your personal style.

As you can see, DIY projects don’t have to be intimidating or labor-intensive! Use these project ideas to channel your creativity and add your own personal touch to each of your creations. Using salvaged materials in your DIY projects is doubly rewarding because you exercise your right brain-creativity and feel accomplished about your finished product, while also feeling good about reducing unnecessary waste and lowering your ecological impact on the planet. So head down to The RE Store to find the supplies you’ll need, and perhaps you’ll find your own source of inspiration there as well.

Special thanks to Diane Lawrence for authoring this article. Diane is an intern at The RE Store in Bellingham, and a senior at WWU, graduating with a Marketing degree in the spring. 

 

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PSE’s Re-Energized by Design winners – designing around reuse

Scott and Nia Sayers spent the last six months winning a competition that remodeled their home’s interior, benefitted their family and their professional lives, all while designing around reuse. That contest was Puget Sound Energy’s Re-Energized by Design challenge that pitted six households against each other in a contest that we quote here from the PSE site:

“Re-Energized by Design is a ‘design show’ style competition, where six PSE customers are competing in a series of five room-by-room makeover challenges to combine creative home design with energy efficiency. After each challenge, one contestant is eliminated. PSE provides contestants with a weekly cash allowance, energy-efficient products, and a design coach to help implement stylish energy-efficient home upgrades.”

Designing with reuse - Nia Sayers Window Display - Bubble TubThe Sayers have been designing around reuse for many years. Nia Sayers did window displays at The RE Store in Bellingham in 2008 and 2009. Nia came up with inspiring concepts like a salvaged claw-foot bathtub full of light globes and lightbulbs as bubbles.

Nia Sayers Serving table displayThen there was her outdoor serving table that she built from a table base rescued from the brink of the landfill. Click on the photo thumbnails for full-sized photos. Nia has taught workshops on DIY skills like recovering upholstery and her idea for this project is downloadable here.

Scott Sayers - Chevy Chase - Recycled Arts Show 2013Scott just had pieces in both Bellingham galleries for the 12th Annual Recycled Arts Show. If you missed his perfect rendering of Chevy Chase in negative relief that was cut out of duct tape, the photo doesn’t do it justice. Scott said that for the Re-Energized by Design competition that “The RE Store was our secret weapon.”

When asked about how all of the remodeling of the family’s home wrapped up, Nia said, “We still have some projects to finish up.”

And don’t we all…

Check out the Re-Energized by Design website for all of the stories, more resources for saving money and making a home more efficient. You might pick up some creative and clever ways to improve home interiors and make it more energy-efficient. And learn more about Nia on her site, SummerLandStyle.com.

Posted in: Green business, RE Store Rockstar Project, Stories about people, Stories about stuff, Video posts, You can do it yourself

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Outdoor Cinemas, Flying Beds & Funky Junk at NW Flower & Garden Show

Flower and Garden Show Booth CollageDid you ever ride on a flying bed made from old stair stringers and reclaimed fir posts at the NW Flower and Garden Show? If you didn’t get a chance to see it in person, we had a suspended day bed from which to watch the movie screen on the side of the “house” with salvaged beveled siding. Cabinet drawers arranged around the bed were filled with various bedding annuals and perennials. An outdoor kitchen sported one of the much acclaimed “Big Green Egg” hybrid grill/oven/smoker and a nice used cook top. Random reclaimed rummagings were used for planters and a vertical pallet garden filled out the vignette.

The Flower & Garden Show seminars are always a big highlight, bringing experts on a wide variety of experts on gardening, plants, garden design, food and more.  We proposed two seminars this year and were chosen as two of the 85 speakers from almost 250 proposals.

Thanks to everyone who came out to see us at the Flower and Garden Show this year – it is always great to meet new folks and catch up up with old friends! We had a great time designing and building this booth – this year’s theme was an “Outdoor Cinema” in line with the larger show’s theme of “Silver Screen – Take Root”.

Eberhard Eichner, our master of REvision Division furniture building in Bellingham talked about making the most of small urban gardening spaces outdoor furniture and demonstrated how to build a planter box, bench seat and arbor

Jason Darling, our Education and Marketing Coordinator, presented an inspiring slideshow with photos and videos of creative planters, fences and screens, pavers and patios, arbors, sculptural accents, water features and weird old unidentifiable things. Everything was made from reclaimed materials and he even did some good networking, soliciting artists for our 12th Annual Recycled Arts Show.

Thanks so much to our friends at Seattle Urban Farm Company for teaming up with us on our booth at the Flower & Garden Show – and to Sutter Home & Hearth for loaning us the “Big Green Egg” grill/smoker for the outdoor kitchen – and thanks to Sky nursery for loaning us some plants too.

Posted in: Green business, Stories about stuff, Transforming the building industry, You can do it yourself

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Economical RE-design Made Possible with Salvage Cabinets

by RE Store Rockstar and customer, Kathleen, of Lily-Max Design

A couple approached me when they were thinking about putting their home on the market.  They knew there was a lot to do to get it ready for sale and wanted to stretch that budget as far as possible, so they hired me to re-design their home to make it more appealing to potential buyers.  As most of us know, the kitchen can either make or break a sale.  We wanted to make it shine, without having to gut it or break the bank.

We replaced the counters and splurged on a mosaic glass tile backsplash, but kept all of the existing cabinets and repainted them with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint.  This worked so well, as all we needed to do was clean and wipe on a little deglosser/liquid sandpaper, then paint.  Once cured, we sealed them with water-based Polycrylic in a satin finish.

We found two mismatched base cabinets at The RE Store in Bellingham and used them to create a prep/baking area for the empty space near the refrigerator.  One cabinet has two drawers with cabinets below and a cool pull-out shelf inside, the other has lots of drawer space – perfect for utensils, oven mitts, etc.  They were both in a wood finish that had seen better days.  We removed their tops, put them together, added some base trim and painted them the same as the existing cabinets.  We then added a butcher block top for the counter, a shelf made from reclaimed wood, and new hardware.  We were able to add much needed storage and a prep area for very little money (around $120 total).

Nice economical re-design great re-use, Kathleen!  You can find out more about Lily-Max Design at www.lilymax.com

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Hammer Like a Girl – a trio of RE Store Rockstars

Heidi, Monica and Mary Jean of HammerLikeAGirl.com are three Seattle girls with backgrounds in graphic design, architecture, construction, and real estate – with a preference for rusty, worn, and modern. Once a week they get together at one of their houses and tackle a project together.  They brainstorm, research, design, create, build – and they “always have lunch”, Mary Jean likes to add.  They submitted a couple of their recent projects created out of material from The RE Store:

In the words of Heidi:
I needed a small bookshelf for a narrow space. I found wire school/swim baskets at The RE Store and a window frame that had been a door side lite, so it was tall and narrow.  I attached the baskets to the wood sidelite frame with wood screws and large washers. A note: verify that your sidelite or alternate frame is the same width or narrower as the baskets you will be attaching.

The wire basket and side-lite bookshelf

My previous RE Store purchase of a 5′ bookcase came with an unfinished end panel. The bookcase is a pretty aged and worn piece so it needed something a little different. Also, thinking that it would either a.) be a really long time before we would make a nice paneled trim piece for it, or b.) it didn’t deserve a nice paneled trim piece,  I decided to clad it in an old sign I found what at first glance was one old funky black and white blocky sign for all of $1. I made a rectangular template to isolate different views of the sign, and cut it into 3 pieces.

I wanted to mock up the design so we measured the panel and made a cropping template with paper.  We marked and cut the sign with a circular saw, with straight edge, clamped to a table.  We then sanded the edges with fine sandpaper to finish off the edges. We pre-drilled the nail holes in the plywood sign, because it was thin and we were nailing so close to the edge. We could have used screws, but liked the look of the nails better. And it is good for now – maybe someday I’ll get around to putting something more refined on there, but then again, probably not! 

The sinage end panel

HammerLikeAGirl.com was created to share our experiences in hopes of encouraging others to team up with friends on their projects. We’d love to hear what projects you are tackling. Just remember, when girls band together, anything is possible. Ok, boys can join the band, too. But they have to get a permission slip from their moms! Making progress is kind of addicting so if you and friends dive in, remember to come up for air!

We love seeing this type of collective happening!  Thanks so much to Heidi, Monica and Mary Jean for being such avid customers of The RE Store, and for their creativity.

Do you have a RE Store-inspired project to be proud of?  Please, show off & share your story!

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How to make tables from recycled materials II: Edging with trim

Ensemble of short tables

Ensemble of short tables made with these techniques

So you learned how to make a solid base for your table in the first video. In this second part of The RE Store’s REvision Division video series about making small tables from reclaimed materials, learn innovative ways to use salvaged materials for the rim of a small table. Watch Eberhard use corner blocks and pieces of moulding to create easy, forgiving details with the table tops. These techniques eliminate tricky mitre cuts and joints around the rim of a table.

REvision Division galleries at The RE Store in Seattle (Ballard) or Bellingham feature one-of-a-kind furniture and decor items built in Bellingham by The RE Store. Come view the latest highly affordable, stylish and creative reuse examples or steal our ideas to design your own pieces.

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